I am a complete beginner at singing and probably may already have damaged vocal cords. Everytime I try to go to a slightly higher note, my voice starts getting shaky which makes me to sound goofy when singing. Also, I have a weak voice which sounds really breathy and combined with the shaky voice, it really just makes matters worst. With that, how can I get rid of these problems when singing?


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· 2 yr. ago · Stickied comment
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level 1
· 2 yr. ago

Look up vocal compression exercises and breath support exercises.


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level 2
· 2 yr. ago

Let me hijack this thread for a minute:

I have the same problem: my voice sounds weak and a bit shaky. Doesn't sound bad, people like it, but I want to make it sound even better. But whenever I ask this question, people tell me to search it myself.

But I don't know what sources to search exactly. When I search what you said, most results are ads for paid courses. I don't know what will actually help me and what is bullshit.

Can you, or anyone, point in a more specific direction to finding these answers?


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Continue this thread 


level 2
· 2 yr. ago
Okay! will do


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level 1
· 2 yr. ago

When singing those high notes, do you tend to notice that your voice sounds strained or feels strained? When you sing, as you know, you use your vocal cords. Just like any other muscle, they can suffer from injuries when they are stretched out too much. I recommend that you learn how to use vibrato. Now, the method in which you learn to apply this can depend on which style you're going for (opera vibrato techniques are similar to ones for other styles, but they are also different because a more operatic voice is different than one that's more suitable for pop).

I also recommend that you practice many breathing exercises. These are crucial when you need to reach higher notes. Sometimes, taking a good breath is all you need to be able to reach those notes.

Learning to project your voice correctly without harming it is also extremely helpful in these situations.

Penultimately, you should also make sure that your warm-up is sufficient so that you can reach those higher notes without straining yourself. I suggest that you warm up for at least five to ten minutes before singing something that may require you to sing those higher notes. Again, the vocal cords are just like any other muscle, if not more fragile. Warm-ups are extremely important for keeping your voice in good condition.

Finally, I suggest that you find a good vocal teacher that specializes in the style of singing that you are going for. Vocal teachers know how to explain this better and how to teach you to use those muscles in a way that gets a result that you like and is relatively safe for your voice.

See more: Name A Job An Athlete Might Have After They Retire, 10 Careers That Any Athlete Can Transition Into

REMEMBER: If your voice starts to hurt at any point when you sing, stop. It's not worth it to force yourself to reach high notes if it means giving up your voice or losing your voice in the process. Keep your vocal cords hydrated; drink a lot of water and tea (but not too scalding tea! This can burn your vocal cords) and breathe through your nose, not your mouth, which can dry your vocal cords more easily and make you susceptible to colds.